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8 Small Steps to a Big Organic Christmas

Hayley Coristine: With holiday music filling the airwaves and twinkling Santas lighting up the city streets, it’s hard to ignore the warm fuzzy feeling that bubbles up before Christmas. At the same time, while many of us try to avoid needless buying for the rest of the year, this season can sometimes feel like a bit of a moral dilemma. Let’s face it: when your kid is pushing for the sleek sophistication of the latest in touchscreen technology, a pair of argyle socks just isn’t going to cut it. To help subdue your internal conflict, here are eight tips to celebrate an ethical, environmentally-friendly Christmas that doesn’t cost the earth.

27 November 2014 | 3 Comments | Recommended by 2

Seasonal thoughts – why cheap food is costing us dearly

Marianne Landzettel: Sunday supplements are brimming with recipe ideas for festive dinners, supermarket shelves are stacked high with seasonal favourites and tempting offers like 3 for 2 deals. Combine this with the steady stream of worrying news about the world economy being on the precipice of another downturn and it is clear why there’s a demand for cheap food. But while we enjoy getting more for less, maybe it’s also time to ask who ultimately pays for cheap food? The answer is: we all do, though not at the supermarket till.

24 November 2014 | 2 Comments | Recommended by 3

A breath of life for bees

Amy Leech: Today’s news that Waitrose are suspending the use of the three neonicotinoids in their supply chain is a ray of hope for the bees amidst predictably grey skies and gloomy headlines.

12 April 2013 | 7 Comments | Recommended by 9

The birds and the bees - a fact of life?

Amy Leech: The birds and the bees...that’s life, or so we say – as we try to explain the ways of nature in a way that saves our blushes, and our children’s ears from hearing the facts of life too early. They’ll soon learn of course. But when will we?

18 June 2012 | 9 Comments | Recommended by 6

Trust in our instincts

Rob Haward: It’s not often you hear Churchill quoted at a Soil Association conference but I found it heartening to hear Helen Browning use his words to describe the role that science should play in the future of food and farming – ‘on tap, not on top’. Organic farmers and growers, supported ably by the Soil Association, have a proud history of trusting extinct over accepted scientific ‘wisdom’. In the pursuit of innovation based on a sound evidence base we must be wary that we don’t lose the confidence to make judgements based on common sense, instinct and sound principles.

02 March 2012 | 2 Comments | Recommended by 4

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