Agro-ecology: Science & Practice for Sustainable Farming

26 June 2013 10:00 - 26 June 2013 17:00

ORC Wakelyns Agroforestry, Metfield Lane, Fressingfield, Eye, Suffolk, IP21 5SD

Experts will offer challenging views on the use of energy in society and agriculture, showing how the application of agro-ecology to crop production can improve energy balances while maintaining biodiversity in agricultural systems.  A farm tour will highlight a brand new EU project in agroforestry and showcase the range of cropping ideas in progress, with the latest from Brussels on regulations affecting wheat populations.   Our new principal scientist and team leader for crops and agroforestry, Dr. Robbie Girling, will be joining the discussions. 

Programme:
 
10:00 – Arrivals and refreshments
 
10:20 – Welcome from Martin Wolfe to Wakelyns Agroforestry and from Nic Lampkin, Director of ORC
 
10:30 – Steve Jones, Permaculture: The Energy Crisis and Agriculture
 
11:00 – Pete Ianetta, The James Hutton Institute: Functional Diversity: the Values of Wild Arable Plants
 
11:30 – Refreshment break
 
12:00 – Barbara Smith, The Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust (TBC): Finding room for all in farming
 
12:30 – Discussion
 
13:15 – Lunch
 
14:15 – Farm Tour: Agroforestry and Arable demonstrations and trials
 
16:00 – Refreshment break and discussion
 
17:00 – Finish
 
Registration and payment:
 
Cost: £30 + VAT per person, includes lunch and all refreshments.
 
£10 + VAT discount for ORC Friends, Participatory Research Network and IOTA members
 
To book a place and request discounts if applicable, please contact Gillian Woodward:
 
Email: gillian.w[at]organicresearchcentre[dot]com
Phone: +44 (0)1488 658298 - extn. 554
Fax: +44 (0)1488 658503
Postal address: Elm Farm, Hamstead Marshall, Newbury, Berkshire, RG20 0HR



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