Future Growers - traineeships and apprenticeships

The Soil Association’s Future Growers programme matches enthusiastic growers with organic host farms across the UK.

The programme is recognised as the gold-standard in learning about organic horticulture. The two year paid apprenticeship combines farm-based practical work with structured seminars and visits. There is also a six month long paid traineeship available. Both options support growers with expert teaching and regular mentoring from organic farmers who are out in the field.

In order to meet high demand, we are seeking new host farms interested in changing the face of farming. As a host farm, you must be committed to the wider organic movement and be able to provide your apprentices with a rich learning environment. In return, you’ll benefit from the work of growers who are eager to learn about organic, sustainable food production.

Find out more

How to apply

New placements are advertised on our News and placements page. We also send them out in our newsletter.

Keep in touch

Our partners

The Organic Apprenticeship Scheme is run in collaboration with the Organic Growers Alliance and the Organic Research Centre.

Supported by

Frank Parkinson Agricultural Trust

Blog

Farming on empty – California in the 4th drought year

Marianne Landzettel: Californians are taking shorter showers, rip out the front lawn to plant cacti while in the nearby mountains numerous forest fires feed on tinder-dry brush. Leave the Pacific behind, cross the Coastal Range and you’ll get to the Central Valley. Over 700 km long, flat as a pancake, with rich soils, mild winters and an average of 300 days of sunshine, the Central Valley is the most productive and profitable agricultural region in the United States: California produces 97% of all kiwis, 95% of all celery, 89% of all spinach, consumed in the US. With roughly 1.8 million cows California is the nations biggest dairy producer. But by far the most valuable crops are nuts, pistachios, cashews, walnuts and of course almonds.

25 August 2015 | 1 Comments | Recommended by 0