Dale Orr of Churchtown Farm in County Down

"I decided that organic farming was the only way I wanted to farm because it is sustainable and gives due consideration to animal welfare and the environment."

Dale OrrChurchtown Farm is a 200 ha mixed livestock and arable farm located on the picturesque shores of Strangford Lough in Co Down, Northern Ireland. The farm keeps 130 beef cows, 200 ewes and one Tamworth sow. The breeds were chosen specifically for the flavour of their meat which is sold in the farm shop, farmers markets and online. The cattle are Aberdeen Angus, Beef Shorthorn and Hereford and the sheep are pure-bred Lleyn.

Can you give a short history of how you got to where you are now, including why and when you 'went organic'?

Coming home from university in 1996, I decided that organic farming was the only way I wanted to farm because it is sustainable and gives due consideration to animal welfare and the environment. Nothing could be more satisfying than walking through fields of contented animals in a diversity of natural wildlife.

I began conversion in 1998 and soon realised that the opportunity existed to sell my organic meats directly to consumers in my locality. I spent two years training in meat technology and gained the necessary approvals to open my shop and become the first farmer in Northern Ireland to sell certified organic meat. I was fortunate to win a number of national awards for the quality of my beef and lamb and so set up my own website to sell to a wider public. I now supply organic beef, lamb and pork to customers all over the UK and Ireland.

Who are your customers and where are they?

My customers are varied and widespread, old and young, and come from all sectors of society. They realise that our meat costs a little extra, but feel it is a price worth paying. They appreciate the quality and care that has gone into producing it. They are reassured that our meat is safe and traceable back to our farm and continue to return to us. Many have become friends.

What do you love most about what you do?

I love the variety of my work. One day I may be working with the cows on the farm, the next I may be cutting meat in the farm shop, and the next I may be selling it in St George’s Market in Belfast. Every day is different with a different challenge and a different satisfaction. Positive customer feedback in the farm shop or at farmers’ markets reinforces my belief that I am doing something worthwhile and encourages me to take the business forward in the future.

What do you find most frustrating about what you do?

My main frustration is not being able to find enough hours to do everything I would like to do. I would like to spend more time developing my business and expanding my product range. I have ideas for novel and interesting products for the future but I haven’t yet found the time to develop them. Let’s hope I will, one day soon.

What other organic ventures do you admire and why?

I recently had the privilege of visiting Abbey Home Farm in Gloucestershire and was very impressed by the work of John Newman there. The animals were very healthy and obviously content, the farm shop was incredibly well stocked with a good range of organic produce, the majority of which had been produced on the farm. I left Abbey Home Farm inspired to explore new ideas in the future.

Who or what is your biggest inspiration?

My biggest inspiration, is a customer of mine, John Boyle, of Boylesports.com. He inspired me to make changes in my life and gave me the confidence to progress the business further and believe that Churchtown Farm will be incredibly successful in the future.

What is the most important lesson life has taught you?

The most important lesson I have learned is to stay calm, no matter what challenges arise. This enables you to respond best to these challenges and achieve a successful result out of any situation.

When were you happiest?

I was happiest as a child working together with the men on the farm, during the summer holidays. The ‘craic’ was great and there was always plenty to do and a great sense of team spirit created by my Uncle Frankie. My goal is to maintain a similar team spirit within my own team at Churchtown Farm, where everyone is happy and motivated to achieve the best possible results.

What is your favourite word?

My favourite words are a local expression ‘no bother’. When I thank a local person for doing something for me and they say ‘no bother’ it means they appreciated me saying thank you and we both feel good.

What is your favourite meal?

My favourite meal is scampi and chips, followed by apple pie and ice cream.

To find out more visit www.churchtownfarmorganicproduce.com



Bookmark and Share




Meet more heroes...

Simon Bennett of Riverside Organics in Cheshire
"So many people have no idea what 'organic' means, or they think it is fancy! If they knew how food was produced most people would choose organic."
Jonathan Smith of Scilly Organics in the Isles of Scilly
"Many things in our life need to be more localised, and it must start with food. There are some fantastic examples of local food working, but it needs to become much more widespread to put the heart back into communities."
Dr Mariano Spiezia of Inlight organic skincare
"Organic status has been my choice to guarantee to our customers that we are using the best ingredients in order to create products without any harmful chemicals to promote health and wellbeing, safeguarding the environment."
Geetie Singh of the Duke of Cambridge in North London
"Always stand by your principles - you may be less well off financially, but you will be better off in yourself. Money just buys you the same stuff but at a higher price."
Andrew Davenport of QR Composting Solutions in Bingfield, Newcastle upon Tyne
"This method of composting completely transformed the compost I made and also my garden. I became hooked and developed a fascination for the method and its history..."
Will Best of Manor Farm in Dorset
"I see a future in which world agriculture is based on organic principles. It may not be fully organic as we understand it, but it will be scientifically sound and sustainable."
Christopher Dawson of Clearspring in West London
"The sustainability of any endeavour or concept depends on organic principles, yin and yang, movement and rest. The same applies to agriculture. No rules, no game."
Abi and Margaret Weeds of Essential Care in Suffolk
"We'd like to continue breaking the boundaries in creating unsurpassed quality organic, ethical health & beauty products, so even more people can enjoy their benefits and lead a healthier, safer lifestyle."
Victoria Thompson of Green Nippers in Barnsley
"We wanted to make a difference to the world, so the use of organic fabrics was extremely important. Using organic cotton is not only better for the whole supply chain, but for the wearer too."
Jeanette Orrey, School Meals Policy Advisor to the Soil Association
"My vision is that every child has a right to good wholesome school food and that food poverty will be a thing of the past."